How to be Resilient: Four Habits of the Most Resilient People

A recent article on fastcompany.com listed four habits of the most resilient people and described them so we can try them on for size.

Here are the four habits, as shown in the article:

1) They don’t listen to the negative voices in their heads.

Listening to the negative commentary we all have running through our minds just gives it more power. Whether your negative commentary is about body image or your company’s reputation, try shutting out the negative stuff. Don’t pay it any mind. Don’t focus on it. And while you’re ignoring the negative, give some encouragement to that positive commentary. Let it come out and help you.

2) They have a personal board of directors.

The article advises people to have personal boards of directors, as you would in your corporate life. If it works for closing corporate deals and deciding what move the company should make next, then why not for dealing with personal stress and life decisions? Strong leaders need to be resilient, but that doesn’t just mean in the workplace. Consider developing your own personal board of directors and see if it helps. And no, you don’t have to sit in a boardroom for this to work; you don’t even need to meet with all your directors at once! It’s the gist of the idea that the author suggests we apply to our lives.

3) They are comfortable not knowing.

The author suggests that to become more resilient, we should become more comfortable with not knowing everything. She connects it to being able to feel comfortable when having to do things on the spot, like communicating an emergency to the public, for example. What do you think you could handle doing, even if you weren’t prepared for it?

4) They let go the “Yeah, but…”

This ties directly in to the first habit on the list. The “Yeah, but” commentary is another form of negative thought. It’s doubting ourselves or it’s being afraid or it’s being lazy, every “Yeah, but” is said to counter something. The author warns us to be careful of letting a “Yeah, but” hold us back. While this may be good advice for getting introverts to come out of their shells or for giving someone the confidence to go after that dream job, there’s nothing wrong with applying this advice in our business lives too. Is there a “Yeah, but” holding your company back right now?

 

For more information, click here: http://www.fastcompany.com/3026817/leadership-now/4-habits-of-the-most-resilient-people