The Far-Reaching Affects of the Global Water Crisis

The search for the cure to cancer is a worthwhile endeavor. And while this thought preoccupies Western culture, a more pressing need worldwide is a lack of one simple thing: clean drinking water. What we take for granted here in the U.S. is a precious commodity in other parts of the globe. The World Health Organization (WHO) says that 1 in 3 people do not have access to clean water, something all humans need every day just to survive. What’s worse is that an estimated 2 million people die annually due to a lack of clean water, according to http://communities.washingtontimes.com.

Not only does this lack of water affect lives, it also has an impact upon the economics of a given region. For every dollar invested into producing clean water, eight dollars that can go toward improving the economics, sanitation, education and standards of living.

There are many Non-Government Organizations (NGOs) that seek to tackle the problems of underdeveloped countries. Two such organizations are the Water Missions International (WMI) and Living Water International (LWI).

WMI, a nonprofit, seeks to provide clean drinking water to those who lack access to it around the world. One way they do this is through large sustainable solar-powered water filters. These solar-powered water filters provide enough water for a village of up to 5,000 people. LWI, also a nonprofit, approaches the crisis by installing wells in communities that lack clean water. Their service to mankind also comes with a faith-based message.

Both NGOs have their own respective projects to try and make a difference in the situation. WMI’s “I Am the Remedy” project is an awareness program with four main steps.

1. Realization of the problem
2. Giving a matching donation through financial means
3. Wearing a free Water Missions wristband
4. Ordering wristbands for friends and family, to help spread the word

2. Giving a matching donation through financial means
3. Wearing a free Water Missions wristband
4. Ordering wristbands for friends and family, to help spread the word

LWI on the other hand has their successful project called “10 Days.” Thousands of college students wore a “10 Days” bracelet during October for 10 days. Part of this project was a pledge to drink nothing but water by the participants for 10 days. All the money saved from drinking water as opposed to other beverages was then donated to the organization to help their efforts.

It all boils down to not just raising awareness, but also encouraging others to take a more active role in trying to make a difference.

For more information about the worldwide water crisis and efforts to help, visit: http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/conserving-freedom/2011/oct/29/global-water-crisis-facts-and-how-people-are-helpi/